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Ongoing contraception after use of emergency contraception from a specialist contraceptive service

  • Sharon T. Cameron
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Dean Terrace Centre, 18 Dean Terrace, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh EH4 INL, Scotland, UK. Tel.: +44 131 343 0912; fax: 131 332 2391.
    Affiliations
    Dean Terrace Centre, NHS Lothian, 18 Dean Terrace, Edinburgh, EH4 1NL, Scotland, UK

    Department of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, University of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, EH16 5SU, Scotland, UK
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  • Anna Glasier
    Affiliations
    Department of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, University of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, EH16 5SU, Scotland, UK
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  • Anne Johnstone
    Affiliations
    Department of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, University of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, EH16 5SU, Scotland, UK
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  • Leanne Rae
    Affiliations
    College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, Scotland, UK
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      Abstract

      Background

      A consultation for emergency contraception (EC) gives way to an opportunity to provide women with an ongoing effective method of contraception.

      Study Design

      A review of the case notes of women seeking EC from a large family planning clinic in Edinburgh, Scotland, was conducted to determine what percentage of women were provided with an effective method of ongoing contraception.

      Results

      Case notes of 460 women presenting for EC over a 2-year period were reviewed. Women were of mean age 26 years (range 15���49 years) and presented because they had used no contraception (47%), experienced condom failure (42%) or missed oral contraceptive pills (9%). Only 2% (n=11) were given an intrauterine device for EC. All women who had missed contraceptive pills prior to taking EC opted to continue this method. Only 23% (n=89) of women using no method or condoms at EC received supplies of an effective contraceptive method (pills, patch, injectable). Two thirds (n=263) of the women chose condoms for ongoing contraception.

      Conclusion

      Research is required to develop strategies to improve the uptake of effective contraception after EC.

      Keywords

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