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Factors associated with the use of irreversible contraception and continuous use of reversible contraception in a cohort of HIV-positive women

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Nadia Kancheva Landolt and Reshmie Ashmanie Ramautarsing contributed equally to the manuscript.
    Nadia Kancheva Landolt
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. The HIV Netherlands Australia Thailand Research Collaboration, The Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre, 104 Rajdumi Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. Tel.: +66-2-652-3040; fax: +66-2-252-5779.
    Footnotes
    1 Nadia Kancheva Landolt and Reshmie Ashmanie Ramautarsing contributed equally to the manuscript.
    Affiliations
    The HIV Netherlands Australia Thailand Research Collaboration (HIV-NAT), Bangkok, Thailand
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Nadia Kancheva Landolt and Reshmie Ashmanie Ramautarsing contributed equally to the manuscript.
    Reshmie Ashmanie Ramautarsing
    Footnotes
    1 Nadia Kancheva Landolt and Reshmie Ashmanie Ramautarsing contributed equally to the manuscript.
    Affiliations
    The HIV Netherlands Australia Thailand Research Collaboration (HIV-NAT), Bangkok, Thailand

    Department of Global Health, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development (AIGHD), Amsterdam, the Netherlands
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  • Nittaya Phanuphak
    Affiliations
    The Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre, Bangkok, Thailand

    SEARCH, Bangkok, Thailand
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  • Nipat Teeratakulpisarn
    Affiliations
    The Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre, Bangkok, Thailand
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  • Suteeraporn Pinyakorn
    Affiliations
    The HIV Netherlands Australia Thailand Research Collaboration (HIV-NAT), Bangkok, Thailand
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  • Piyanee Rodbamrung
    Affiliations
    The Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre, Bangkok, Thailand
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  • Surasith Chaithongwongwatthana
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
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  • Jintanat Ananworanich
    Affiliations
    The HIV Netherlands Australia Thailand Research Collaboration (HIV-NAT), Bangkok, Thailand

    The Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre, Bangkok, Thailand

    SEARCH, Bangkok, Thailand

    Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Nadia Kancheva Landolt and Reshmie Ashmanie Ramautarsing contributed equally to the manuscript.

      Abstract

      Background

      Effective contraception can be lifesaving by reducing maternal mortality linked to childbirth and unsafe abortion and by reducing vertical and horizontal transmission of HIV, in the case of an HIV-positive woman.

      Study design

      This study is a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study. We assessed factors associated with the use of irreversible contraception and the continuous use of reversible contraception in HIV-positive Thai women. We used descriptive statistics to present baseline characteristics and logistic regression to assess the association between contraceptive use and factors in the study.

      Results

      Of 196 women included in the analysis, 87% self-reported always using male condoms and 56% continuously using another effective contraceptive method during the period of the study (12���18 months). The choice of effective contraceptive methods was suboptimal ��� 42% were sterilized, 14% used hormonal contraception and no participant reported the use of an intrauterine device. Sexual activity and past contraceptive use were factors associated positively with current continuous contraceptive use. Live births and lower levels of education were additional factors associated positively with sterilization.

      Conclusions

      Despite high contraceptive use, there are still uncovered contraceptive needs among HIV-positive women in Thailand. HIV-positive women need established specialized family planning services, offering an optimal variety of contraceptive choices and tailored to their individual needs. As sterilization is an irreversible choice, it cannot be a viable alternative for every woman. Due to the positive trend between current and past contraceptive use, we consider that it may be possible to improve family planning programs if they start as early as possible in a woman's life and are continued throughout her sexually active and reproductive years.

      Keywords

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